Driving Torque

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Archive for the tag “Ford Fiesta”

Ford Fiesta 1.0l EcoBoost Zetec Powershift – Driven and Reviewed

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An automatic Ford Fiesta. My engrained reaction to this would usually be one of disdain, with just a splash of derision. Auto ‘boxes have traditionally been the reserve of the more senior driver and large, officious type vehicles, being driven by large, officious type people, in their large, officious type business suits, eating their large………you get the idea.

No more manual?

ford_fiesta_powershift_automatic_gearstickAll this could be about to change, though. Many people within the industry have referred to their crystal balls and predicted that the manual ‘box and it’s vice-like grip on the on the market may be coming to and end. Advances in gearbox technology such as double clutches like this one here, and CVT have seen the clutch pedal become slightly less common, even in Europe where we’ve subtly sniggered for years at the USA’s anxious aversion to ‘driving stick’.

If Ford have got it right, this ‘Powershift’ Fiesta should be as good as any more diminutive automatic car, then. The engine is their much-lauded EcoBoost three cylinder unit in 100PS guise; a power source that seemingly knows no bounds and marches on in its mission to change the world. The manual variant of this car is a world-beater; the Fiesta is Britain’s top-selling nameplate and with good reason (read the review here). Great place to start, then, but by taking away the need to change gear, have Ford lost anymore of the Fiesta’s appeal in the process? ford_fiesta_powershift_automatic_display

Refined and Smooth

The Powershift gearbox is refined enough; there’s no clunky, head-jarring up-changes, and it goes upwards from cog to cog with little fuss and in near silence. Higher gears are hung onto a touch too long when going back down through the range which takes a little of the fun out of cornering, but there is the option to change down yourself via a switch – this may detract from the point somewhat, though. Creeping slowly through traffic amplifies the nature of the three-cylinder engine, and there is a ‘put-put‘ feel under 5mph. Any quicker and the engine is as refined and characterful as usual, doing whatever’s asked of it dutifully. There’s even a ‘Sport’ mode available; select this and you’ll be amazed at how quickly 99bhp can propel what isn’t a tiny car anymore, whilst still giving a smooth ride.

Sounds Perfect!!……..

So, it’s business as usual with the trustworthy Fiesta, and you don’t even have to change gear yourself. Sounds too good to be true – surely every model will be this way from now on and the manual ‘box will soon become a thing of the past. Maybe not though – there are a couple of downsides to this added convenience.

………Oh

One age-old drawback of automatic ‘boxes was always the reduction in economy, and it still rings true here. Combined MPG drops from an impressive 65.7 to a slightly-less-so, 57.7, and CO2 rises from 99g/km to 114g/km. This, of course, takes the car into the realms of *shock-horror* paying VED, or road tax. Let’s put this into perspective here though; it’s still only in band C, which will lighten your purse by a measly £30 per annum, so nothing to lose any sleep over.

The addition of the auto ‘box isn’t the only reason for the Powershift’s drop in economy, though. The fact that it loses Stop/Start may not make that much of a difference in the real world, but it does affect things when the powers-that-be measure emissions. Ford themselves state that it’s not financially viable at this stage to add Stop/Start to the Fiesta but, for me, that’s not giving it a fighting chance. If the car proves popular enough, expect Stop/Start to suddenly appear further down the line.ford_fiesta_powershift_automatic_red_side

The other slight issue comes down to the price. With the manual ‘box, the Fiesta EcoBoost 5dr in Zetec trim is available from £14,195 at time of writing. Opt for this auto, and you’ll have to part with a slightly dizzying £15,445; that’s a very expensive gearbox, especially when it’ll also incur the extra running costs I mentioned earlier. It’s still cheaper than some of the competition such as the automatic Clio, but once you start adding extras to this Zetec trim, the price could easily get a little silly. ford_fiesta_powershift_automatic_red_rear

 

 

Automatic gearboxes are becoming more popular, there’s no doubt about it. For now, though, I feel that it comes at slightly too high a price in this Fiesta, both in terms of outlay and driver satisfaction. If you really need or want a smaller auto, this Fiesta is still a good proposition, but you’d have to really need or want one to forego the pretty-near-perfect manual.

By Ben Harrington

Specifications; Ford Fiesta 1.0l EcoBoost Zetec, Transmission – 6 speed automatic, Layout – Front engine, FWD, Power – 99bhp, Torque – 170NM, Emissions – 114g/km CO2, Economy57.7mpg combined, Maximum Speed – 112 mph, Acceleration – 11.2s 0-62mph, Price – £15,795 OTR, £17,390 as tested

For full details, go to; http://www.ford.co.uk

Ford Fiesta Zetec 80PS – Driven and Reviewed

2014FordFiesta_1LiterThree cylinder engines seem to be the current craze amongst manufacturers in their pursuit of increasing mpg whilst leaving performance intact. Amongst others, Hyundai and the latest ‘New’ Minis have adopted the technology, but remember it was Ford and their EcoBoost units that really brought this asymmetrical technology back into the spotlight.

We tested the turbocharged 1.0l EcoBoost Fiesta back in 2013 and were impressed, not only with its peppy engine, but with the refined ride and sorted chassis that’s so willing to be thrown around, especially with this lightweight engine up front.

So, what happens when you take this great recipe and take something away, in this case the turbo? Well, you’d expect performance to suffer, obviously, with the trade-off being even more impressive mpg and even fewer visits to the pumps. Quite bizarrely, only some of this is true – and it’s not good news I’m afraid. This 80ps Fiesta feels laboured around town, unwilling to get up to acceptable speeds without the aid of forced induction, but the improved economy part of the deal seems to have gone amiss somehow.

Ford's EcoBoost engine

Ford’s EcoBoost engine

Both 80ps and 125ps Fiestas return a claimed 65.7mpg combined and emit 99g/km Co2, and I dare say that the stifled acceleration of the lower powered model will encourage drivers to push the engine harder, negating any potential petrol savings as they grow frustrated with travelling so slowly.

One aspect of the 80ps Fiesta’s performance that’s surprisingly good is at higher-speed, on motorways and the like. The lack of turbo is fairly irrelevant when 70mph is reached, and should the need arise, the EcoBoost engine responds admirably when pushed. It’s just a shame that this car was primarily designed with inner-city driving in mind, where it’s found lacking.

I suspect that the 80ps Fiesta will find its way into many homes as a first car for the inexperienced driver, and this is where it could really excel. Speaking as a parent, I’d personally welcome the loss of performance if it were my child’s steed, and you obviously still get all the advantages that come with every Fiesta, such as 5 Euro NCAP stars. It’s also the cheapest way into Fiesta ownership (£13,995), but not only this, its 6E insurance group is significantly lower than other models.

Fiesta 2012 1FordSync-580-90Standard equipment is still impressive for your £14K, but if the budget will extend a little, I’d opt for the Nav system with DAB radio and SYNC system at £700 – it’s not infallible but it’s still one of the best systems on the market.

We’ve grown to expect a lot of bang for our bucks with Ford’s multi-award winning EcoBoost engines. Taking away the turbo has resulted in a decline in the fun factor, but taken in its own right, this version of the much-hailed Fiesta still stands up to scrutiny against the competition, especially in the quality and appeal departments.

 

By Ben Harrington

 

Specifications; Ford Fiesta Zetec 80PSEngine –1.0l EcoBoost three cylinder na petrol, 5 speed manual, Layout – Front engine, FWD, Power –  80ps, Torque – 105NM, Emissions – 99g/km CO2, Economy – 65.7mpg combined, Maximum Speed – 103 mph, Acceleration – 14.9s 0-62mph, Price – £13,995 OTR

 

For full details, go to http://www.ford.co.uk/Fiesta

 

 

 

Ford C-MAX 1.0l Titanium X – Driven and Reviewed

2013 Ford Focus Front angle

2013 Ford Focus Zetec S

So, you’ve been on plenty of test drives, engrossed yourself in a small forest’s worth of brochures and come to the conclusion that Ford’s Focus, powered by their much-lauded 1.0l Ecoboost engine is the car for you and your family.

BUT THEN. You take one last look inside your steed of choice and that nagging feeling creeps into your head again, that sneaking suspicion that it may just be a little small for your needs.

C-MAX Ecoboost front

Ford’s C-MAX

So, what do you do? The prospect of starting at square one again is just one big headache but, don’t despair, there could be an answer and it comes in the shape of Ford’s C-MAX.

Launched in 2003 and originally labelled ‘Focus C-MAX‘, it did resemble exactly that; a slightly disproportional version of Ford’s ubiquitous hatchback whose good looks had faded during the transition process. Now simply named ‘C-MAX’ in its own right, it’s easily identified as part of the Ford stable without the requirement to cling so closely to the Focus‘ coat-tails.

C-MAX Ecoboost rear

Available in 5 and 7 seat (Grand C-MAX) flavours, the two models are easily distinguished by the more voluminous C-MAX’s, slightly van-like rear sliding doors. What we have here for your delectation is the, undoubtedly more attractive, 5 seat C-MAX in range topping Titanium X flavour, powered by that all important, diminutive lump, the 1.0l Ecoboost engine.

Although the C-MAX shares the Focus’ platform and is slightly enhanced in terms of both length and width (4380mm x 2067mm vs 4358mm x 2010mm), it’s the extra height it’s gained (1626mm vs 1461mm) that offers the C-MAX it’s justification over its little brother.

C-MAX Ecoboost side

High shoulder-line and less glasshousing makes C-MAX more purposeful

On the inside, the extra room is noticeable and adds a sensation of airiness, especially when combined with our test car’s panoramic glass roof. The trade-off for this increase in living space in MPVs is usually a more vast glass-house and a certain ‘gold-fish bowl’ sensation. Not so with the C-MAX, however. Ford have apparently raised the car’s shoulder line, keeping glass to a minimum, the result being a more purposeful stance and a less ungainly appearance.

So far then, it’s looking like something of a no-brainer: Why buy the smaller Focus when you can have the C-MAX? It’s well designed and economical, just like the Focus, but you gain a sizeable chunk of extra room to swing the proverbial cat around in. Game over. Decision made.

C-MAX Ecoboost Boot

661 litre boot is cavernous

Well, not quite. I’m the first to admit that I was wrong about Ford’s 1.0l, 3 cylinder Ecoboost engines. On paper, I wrote it off as some marketing stunt that couldn’t possibly work and would result in the most yawn inspiring range of cars that Ford, née, the world had ever seen. Having driven many cars equipped with this marvel of engineering, I could immediately see what the rest of the planet also saw – that it does work. It capably hauls the Focus around without any struggle and in the Fiesta, it’s positively fun.

I’m going to go out on a limb here though and state that I think the C-MAX may be a bridge too far for such a diminutive unit. On paper, the Focus and C-MAX are separated by just 0.1 seconds (11.4s vs 11.3s) in their race to 62mph and the larger model is alleged to achieve better mpg and Co2 levels. In the real world though, things just don’t work like that. The 6 speed ‘box in the C-MAX may go a long way towards achieving those impressive statistics but there’s no getting around the fact that if you want more space, you’re also going to get more weight and your aerodynamic qualities are going to suffer.

I felt that the extra weight of the C-MAX just took the edge off what is still a fun drive in the Focus. The difference is negligible, but to try to achieve adequate fuel consumption figures, the ‘change-up’ light seemed to be quite insistent on a move up the ratios at times, when my natural instinct was to hang onto a gear for a second longer.

Although Ford have done an admirable job of making a compact MPV handsome – no mean feat – the trade-off is an increase in ride height that affects the legendary Focus handling traits. It’s not a significant loss and it would be unfair to say the C-MAX wallows around like an old American police car, but there is a difference.

All this talk of performance and handling in relation to the C-MAX is perhaps unjust as, ultimately, that’s not it modus operandi. So let’s forget it’s Focus roots for a minute and just take it as a stand-alone car – does it score highly compared to its direct competition?

C-MAX Ecoboost interiorThe answer to this would be a resounding ‘Yes’. I’m going to assume that it’s the living space in a car of this nature that makes or breaks a potential sale and this is where the C-MAX excels. The layout and dash may be standard Ford fare but this should in no way be taken as a criticism; it’s attractive, well-built and, perhaps most importantly, simple to use. The theatre style seating will give any rear passengers that commanding view of the road they crave and the extra height of the C-MAX definitely adds an essential sensation of airiness and space – especially when combined with the Titanium X’s panorama roof.

If you’ll allow me to put my critical head back on, I still don’t fully get on with Ford’s Sync system as it seems easily confused but, in true Microsoft style, a simple turn on/turn off procedure seems to remedy any glitches. I’d also be less than 100% trusting of the C-MAX’s self parking system – my first attempt resulted in a collision with the kerb and a coming together with a lamp-post was only narrowly avoided when I intervened with the brake pedal. Some work still required here I feel.

To conclude, the C-MAX is a highly useable, well thought out car, but then most compact MPVs are these days. Where it excels though is its visual charm and it’s car-like drive, just don’t expect it to be quite as sorted as the Focus.

By Ben Harrington

Specifications; Ford C-MAX 1.0l Titanium X, Transmission – 6 spd manual, Layout – Front engine, FWD, Power – 125ps, Torque – 200Nm, Emissions – 117g/km CO2, Economy – 55.4 mpg combined, Maximum Speed – 116mph, Acceleration – 11.4s 0-62mph, Price – £22,345 OTR, £24,020 as tested.

 

All New Ford Fiesta. How does it compare to its predecessor?

2012 Ford Fiesta

2012 Ford Fiesta

Fact; The Ford Fiesta has been Britain’s most popular car every year since 2009 when it knocked its big brother – the Focus off it’s well-worn mantle.

Near Certainty; Unless the price of oil is decimated and the car buying public decides that a 10yr old Range Rover Vogue, equipped with a 4.4 V8 petrol engine (circa £9975) makes more financial sense than Ford’s latest small hatch (from £9795 OTR), the New Ford Fiesta will march on triumphantly to the top of the 2013 charts.

How can I be so sure that the Fiesta won’t be knocked off its lofty perch? Well, Ford seemed to have taken the old adage ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ and used it with consumate wisdom. There are definitely enough revisions and improvements to the 2013 model to justify the ‘All New’ tag, but the majority of the car is taken straight from the previous incarnation which was hardly looking long in the tooth itself.

All New Ford Fiesta

All New Ford Fiesta

I was in the fortunate position to arrive at the New Fiesta launch in Manchester in the previous model that I was road testing. This ‘out of the old, into the new’ situation is undoubtedly the best way to draw comparison as I had every last niggle and highlight fresh in my mind. In the blink of an eye, I was drawn to establishing whether this new car had simply improved upon the last formula, or whether the essence of such a successful model had been lost in the intricacies of launching a car with its own identity and character.

All New Nose

Visually, the new model pulls off the amazing trick of being very similar to its predecessor whilst, at the same time, looking completely different. That trapezoidal nose has actually graced the front end of many Fords, including the Fiesta, for a while now. By adding some shiny brightwork, giving the new model a facelift and swapping the smaller, secondary air inlet from above to below the main ‘mouth’, the resulting car is instantly transformed, not only into a new model but also into a part of the new Ford family image.

Inside

2012 Fiesta Interior, a very pleasant place to be

2012 Fiesta Interior, a very pleasant place to be

Inside the New Fiesta, the changes are negligible which came as no surprise as, again, the previous model’s cabin was chic, funky and fresh, with all manner of eye-catching shapes and materials being utilised in a very similar fashion to the ultra cutting-edge Focus. The quality of materials used and overall attention to detail really have no right to appear in a car in this price bracket and Ford have been quite shrewd in ensuring that possibly the most memorable part of the car is the environment which the occupants see most; the cabin. It really is futile giving a car like this the world’s most attractive engine bay when the majority of its target market have no inclination whatsoever to ever open the bonnet.

New interior, very similar to previous model.

New interior, very similar to previous model.

That said, there were a couple of niggles inside the previous model Fiesta that have now been ironed out, the most significant being the multimedia unit. The unit in my test 2012 model wasn’t disastrously bad, it was just nothing to write home about either; it played CDs, it boasted multiple radio stations, it even had an incredibly useful USB port, into which one could plug one’s Iphone and merrily select tracks in MP3 format. The problems arose when the ‘shuffle’ mode was operated and a random selection of tracks were played. It would reach the end of one track and, instead of instantly choosing the next one to play, the first few lines of the subsequent song would be heard whilst it made up it’s mind. Sounds like a minor annoyance, doesn’t it? You try it, in no time at all it’s incredibly irritating.

Thankfully, Ford have decided to outsource the current multimedia software to a little company who apparently know a thing or two in that field; Microsoft. They’ve concocted a system called Sync and, speaking from first hand experience, it does exactly what it says on the tin, eradicating any previous issues that existed.

MyKey

Another technological innovation on the new Fiesta is a system called MyKey. In a nutshell, it allows the vehicle to be programmed by its owner via the keys, altering settings such as maximum speed, audio volume and the low-fuel warning. The thinking behind this is that parents, worrying about their teenage offspring who are out driving, will be reassured in the knowledge that their pre-armed Fiesta will be working extra-hard to ensure their safe return home. Now, the memories may be getting a little hazy but I can remember enough about being a teenager to state with confidence that this is the last thing I’d have wanted in my car. I also know that, even though it’s generally not their money that’s buying their first car, with enough incessant whining, any teenager worth their salt will be able to influence which car is bought and potentially steer well clear of this ‘big brother’ technology. It’s certainly innovative and will probably attract buyers, my only reservation is that it could possibly deter buyers too.

2012 Model Fiesta Nose......

2012 Model Fiesta Nose……

Ford claim that, due to the state of the global economy, many buyers are choosing to ditch their larger hatchbacks and are opting instead for something Fiesta sized to keep costs down. The fact that their very own Focus was deposed from the top of the charts by the Fiesta corroborates this claim and Ford have decided to act upon it by adding a new range-topping Titanium X model, in order to reinforce that feeling of quality that the Focus driver had previously enjoyed. Combine leather and climate control with the fact that the Mk1 Focus was only 20cm longer than this latest Fiesta and it’s easy to see how a smooth transition can be achieved.

EcoBoost Engines

One monumental leap forwards in this new model is the introduction of Ford’s multi award-winning range of EcoBoost engines. I’d experienced this excellent little three-cylinder in the Focus recently, without disappointment, and I was itching to get my hands on the lighter Fiesta, equipped with the same powerplant. Does it work? Of course it does! I sampled both the 125ps and 100ps variants and both were huge fun with character to burn. I quite safely predict that this excellent engine/chassis/gearbox combination will only reinforce the Fiesta’s rock-solid reputation in the market as it offers a fun factor that it’s competitors can only dream of.

......and New Fiesta Nose. Some shape-shifting going on.

……and New Fiesta Nose. Some shape-shifting going on.

The official economy figures for the Ecoboost models are 65.7mpg combined, admittedly this isn’t a patch on my Duratorq Diesel test car’s 85.6mpg but there are other considerations to be taken into account here. The very nature of the free-revving Ecoboost engine when compared to a fairly reluctant Diesel is hugely important in my opinion and the throaty sound that resonates around the petrol-engined model’s cabin gives a real hot-hatch feel without the associated costs. I also found that the relatively small Fiesta struggled with the extra weight of a Diesel lump up front whereas the lightweight petrol engine made the car less nose-heavy into corners and really did justice to the extremely satisfying driving set up. As both models slip in under that magical 100g/km on emissions, there isn’t a VED issue to separate the two either.

In Conclusion

Ultimately, the Fiesta’s sales figures speak for themselves and it was going to take a series of huge errors for the updated model to ruin such a complete little car. That said, it wasn’t perfect, a fact that Ford weren’t too arrogant to acknowledge and remedy. With its niggles ironed out, it’s striking new look and, perhaps most importantly, the introduction of their EcoBoost engines, the Fiesta will undoubtedly go from strength to strength.

ST due to arrive in April - looks fantastic

ST due to arrive in April – looks fantastic

Oh, did I also mention that the ST model will be along in April, priced from £16,995? More on that to follow……..

By Ben Harrington

Specifications; 2012 Model as Tested – Ford Fiesta Zetec ECOnetic, Engine – 1.6 8V TDCi, Power – 95PS, Maximum Speed – 111mph, Acceleration – 0-62mph 12.9s, Economy – 85.6mpg combined, Emissions87g/km CO2, Price – £15,595 OTR.

2013 Model of choice – Ford Fiesta Zetec S, Engine1.0 Ecoboost Turbo PetrolPower – 125PS, Maximum Speed122mph, Acceleration0-62mph 9.4s, Economy – 65.7 mpg combined, Emissions99g/km CO2, Price –  £15,395 OTR

They always recognise their own, apparently

They always recognise their own, apparently!

News

The all new Peugeot 208

Peugeot have released details and, perhaps more importantly pictures of the upcoming replacement for the 207, the imaginatively titled 208 (One wonders what they’re going to call the replacement for the 209?) I was lucky enough to own a particularly good 205 Gti when I was 18 so this story caught my eye immediately, especially when the Peugeot press office took the bull by the horns and pre-empted that burning question- will they build a Gti that’s fit to wear the badge? They’ve cut kerb weight dramatically in a bid to capture the essence of the 205’s driving ability and have already released details of the all important Gti which will come in two guises, the really hot version being powered by a turbo charged, four cylinder engine producing 204 bhp.

First impressions visually are promising with front overhang reduced dramatically, not only giving the car a more sleek profile overall but also improving handling as Peugeot are so keen to stress was their main focus. There are some neat design touches, the shoulder line incorporating the door handles and fuel cap is smart, even more so where it enters the rear light cluster and performs a U-turn to become the rear indicator. I feel that some aspects of the exterior are almost in competition with each other for your attention which can just result in a headache, I’d describe this as a ‘busy’ look. Peugeot should maybe have followed the old mantra that simplicity is best when deciding which little flicks and curves were appropriate and which should maybe have been saved for the next model.

Peugeot 208

One glaring improvement on all recently released Peugeots is the deletion of that ridiculous ‘wide mouth frog’ front end. The 208 may look a little generic overall, sharing styling cues with the Ford Fiesta and Renault Clio but I feel it’s just about recognisable in a crowd.

Subaru BRZ

In other news, Subaru have released images of their take on their joint venture withToyotato create a sports –coupe. Named the BRZ (Boxer engine, Rear drive, Zenith), it is quite expectedly similar to Toyota’s upcoming FT-86 with only the rear end being significantly different, I would say more aggressive, more Subaru. This model could really do with being a big hit for Subaru as they’ve announced a profits crash of 27%, blaming, amongst other things, the Japanese earthquake that struck earlier this year.

By Ben Harrington

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